Reviving Life’s Joys: Martha’s Journey with Deep Brain Stimulation

Deep Brain Stimulation1

Martha Strange’s journey with Parkinson’s disease led her to a point where her cherished activities, like playing with her granddaughter and enjoying a round of golf, seemed like distant memories. However, a consultation with neurosurgeon Dr. Guy McKhann at Columbia University Medical Center/NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital changed everything.

Dr. McKhann suggested deep brain stimulation, a procedure designed to alleviate the symptoms of advanced Parkinson’s disease that don’t respond to medication. Martha, though nervous about brain surgery, felt instantly at ease with Dr. McKhann’s reassuring demeanor and expertise.

The surgery involved implanting electrodes in Martha’s brain and connecting them to power units in her chest. While it was a significant procedure, Martha emerged successfully and symptom-free. Today, Martha is back on the golf course and enjoying all the activities she once loved.

Her tremors are gone, and walking is no longer a challenge. Martha attributes her renewed quality of life to Dr. McKhann’s skill and care. With her symptoms under control, Martha looks forward to embracing life’s joys, especially the prospect of more grandchildren to play with.

We would like to thank Columbia University, for sharing this educational story with us.  Although this story is not about Ataxia specifically, it does speak to movement disorders. 

Please share your thoughts and/or comments on this or any other article.  And if you would like to get involved and share your experience with Ataxia, please contact us.  Join our community today.  A place where we empower you to build a healthy lifestyle and raise overdue Ataxia Awareness.  Experience transformative storytelling and share your story to inspire positive change.


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